Sapele wood – the popular alternative to mahogany & why Foster made the switch

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  • November 11, 2010

Genuine mahogany was once the premier imported wood species. adidas superstar Its primary growing region is in South America and, to a lesser degree, in Central America and small portions of Mexico. T-shirts tech short sleeve In November 2003, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) imposed stricter regulations on the trade of genuine mahogany, stating that when shipping this wood species, it must be accompanied by a CITES Appendix II permit. After the regulations were in effect, shipments from some areas, such as Brazil, halted, while supplies from Peru and Bolivia scarcely trickled in (supplies still being brought in from Guatemala and Mexico were available, but considered to be of lesser quality). Due to a lowered supply, the price of genuine mahogany doubled and what now was available had a reduced quality. High prices paired with low quality made most people back off from buying genuine mahogany at this stage, and in turn, the overall demand greatly declined. rucksack jack wolfskin perfect day Alternatives to genuine mahogany were quickly being sought out, and one popular candidate was a wood species called sapele (pronounced: suh-pee-lee). Sapele, also called sapele mahogany or scented mahogany, grows in large sections of western and central Africa, from Sierra Leone to Uganda, and south to Angola (this is one of the large canopy trees in the equatorial West African forest). Sapele is a bit harder than genuine mahogany, a little more crystalline in appearance, the sapwood is a white to pale yellow, and the reddish-brown heartwood resembles African mahogany. Cheap MU2 Legend Power Leveling When freshly cut, sapele has a spicy smell, which some compare to a “cedar-like” aroma. mu legend items online It also has characteristics that make it easy to work with, and is said to stain and polish with ease. Foster was one of the many establishments which had to adjust to the situation taking place with genuine mahogany several years back, and thereby searched for an equivalent substitute that we could stand by and be proud of. Ever since we made the switch to sapele and incorporated this wood species into our catalog, we have heard nothing but positive responses.

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